Enhanced Collaboration for the Implementation of the Nassau County Mosquito Surveillance and Control Plan Revised

State: NY Type: Model Practice Year: 2013

:

As a result of the newly emergent Asian Tiger Mosquito (ATM), known to carry Dengue Fever and West Nile Virus (WNV) and is a day-time biter, Nassau County residents have become less tolerant of mosquitoes restricting residents from enjoying the outdoors and impacting on their quality of life. Since 1999, Nassau County has been tasked to control mosquitoes carrying WNV, a disease that pose a human health threat and, historically, has had high incidences of human WNV cases compared to other counties in New York State. Multiple factors influence whether a season yields high viral activity or high mosquito population, or both. Nassau County has a population of 1.34 million and is comprised of predominantly suburban communities with a homeownership rate of 82%. Knowing that populations most susceptible to mosquito-borne illnesses are children under the age of 15 immunocompromised and adults over the age of 50, and nuisance mosquito populations causing human distress, the Nassau County Department of Health (NCDH) recognized the need to take a proactive role in the Mosquito Surveillance and Control Program.

 

:
Nassau County Department of Health
:
Enhanced Collaboration for the Implementation of the Nassau County Mosquito Surveillance and Control Plan Revised
As a result of the newly emergent Asian Tiger Mosquito (ATM), known to carry Dengue Fever and West Nile Virus (WNV) and is a day-time biter, Nassau County residents have become less tolerant of mosquitoes restricting residents from enjoying the outdoors and impacting on their quality of life. Since 1999, Nassau County has been tasked to control mosquitoes carrying WNV, a disease that pose a human health threat and, historically, has had high incidences of human WNV cases compared to other counties in New York State. Multiple factors influence whether a season yields high viral activity or high mosquito population, or both. Nassau County has a population of 1.34 million and is comprised of predominantly suburban communities with a homeownership rate of 82%. Knowing that populations most susceptible to mosquito-borne illnesses are children under the age of 15 immunocompromised and adults over the age of 50, and nuisance mosquito populations causing human distress, the Nassau County Department of Health (NCDH) recognized the need to take a proactive role in the Mosquito Surveillance and Control Program.  Since 2006, the NCDH and the Nassau County Department of Public Works (NCDPW) were assigned separate responsibilities in the County’s Mosquito Surveillance and Control Program. The NCDH is responsible to trap mosquitoes, surveillance and public relations. The NCDPW is responsible to dip for mosquito larvae, apply larvicide and adulticide, and respond to complaints. The challenges and issues concerning the increasing populations of the ATM’s revealed the need to improve communication. In February 2012, the NCDH and the NCDPW met to discuss objectives to revise the program and enhance their collaboration to implement mosquito surveillance and control measures to protect the health of the public for the upcoming summer season. Both Commissioners shared a vision to improve the program and successfully vetted this through the County administration. Each Department designated a liaison to coordinate and troubleshoot initiatives for an improved program. The NCDOH and the NCDPW modified the Nassau County Mosquito Surveillance and Control Plan (NCMSCP), increased their communication both inter and intra-departmentally, and outreached to neighboring counties and educational institutions for guidance and training. Three of the major objectives established to accomplish the tasks were: 1) to improve the decision process for the application of larvicide and adulticide; 2) to improve the development of spray maps for vector control and public notification; and 3) to educate the public on source reduction. Staff was trained during the spring 2012. Staff attended a symposium held at the Suffolk County Health Department for neighboring counties to present an overview of their program and experiences, including an open discussion on how to address the ATM population for the upcoming season. NCDH staff attended a New York City (NYC) Annual Integrated Pest Management Training where experts from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), Connecticut Center for Vector Biology and Zoonotic Diseases, and Rutgers University, Vector Biology Unit presented. By June 2012 the NCMSCP was revised to include a matrix to improve the decision-making process for larvicide and adulticide application, a procedure to address complaints, and vector control measures to address nuisance mosquitoes. Weekly inter and intra-departmental meetings were held throughout the spring and summer to review mosquito trap data collected from 42 trap sites, response to complaints, and results of surveys conducted to determine which areas of the county met the thresholds of the matrix and required either larvicide or adulticide measures to be conducted. Spray maps were developed throughout the summer season, forwarded to NCDH for comments and then submitted for approval to the NYSDEC. The Office of Emergency Management (OEM) utilized a mass notification system to disseminate the County Executive’s messages to the public. The NCDH crafted press releases and modified the spray maps for public notifications. A call center staffed by volunteers and seasonal workers provided information to residents who called. The NCDOH Commissioner delivered a PowerPoint presentation on the revised NCMSCP to elected officials and residents at multiple public forums. An ATM brochure was disseminated to residents at public events. Conditions for the summer 2012 yielded high counts of WNV mosquito activity, ATM population and total mosquito population. The enhanced collaboration between departments and utilization of the decision matrix resulted in an expedited response, on 18 occasions, for the NCDPW to implement control measures, the development of spray maps for half of the land mass of the county and archived for future years, and the outreach to residents on the ATM’s and their need to proactively reduce mosquito breeding areas around their homes.  
Responsiveness The public health issue that this practice addressesMosquitoes have the potential to carry many harmful diseases that can affect humans, livestock and wildlife populations. In 1999 West Nile Virus (WNV) appeared in Nassau County and posed a significant human health threat. This mosquito-borne viral disease can cause serious illness and, in some cases, death. Since 2000 there have been more than 540 cases and 43 deaths in New York State alone. Nassau County has had higher incidences of human WNV cases compared to other counties in New York State. In recent years, the ATM, known to carry dengue fever and WNV, has appeared in Nassau County causing human distress. This aggressive day-time biter is a tree hole and container breeder whose species peaks and persists at a time of year in the County where other species begin to decline. Given the close proximity to New York City where imported Dengue Fever has been reported the NCDH became concerned for the control of this species and it’s competency for spread of serious viral illnesses. Populations most susceptible to mosquito-borne illness are children under the age of 15 immunocompromised and adults over the age of 50. The most effective way to reduce a person’s risk from contracting a mosquito-borne disease is through the prevention of mosquito bites and the control of mosquito breeding sites. The NCDH and NCDPW implement surveillance and control measures to suppress mosquito populations. It is important for residents to know that they can be effective in the control of mosquito populations by taking action on their properties and reduce standing water and breeding sites. Process used to determine the relevancy of the public health issue to the communityResidents increasingly expressed concern to the NCDH, NCDPW, and their elected officials of the potential risk of contracting mosquito-borne diseases and their inability to enjoy the outdoors affecting their quality of life due to the presence of mosquitoes. Surveillance data in recent years revealed growing populations of the ATM. Since this species is a day-time biter, the ability to control and perform adulticide applications is difficult to coordinate when residents and their families during the summer months are out and about. Therefore, public education and outreach is critical in the control of this species. Given, Chapter XII, Article F of the Nassau County Administrative Code provides for the authority for the NCDPW to conduct mosquito control and under the New York State Public Health Law and regulations, the NCDH is vested with the authority to safeguard the public health and welfare of its county residents, there was a need to improve the collaboration between Department’s and the revision to the NCMSCP. How the practice addresses the issueThe improved collaboration between the NCDH and the NCDPW is critical in the successful implementation of a revised NCMSCP. The NCMSCP provides criteria and procedures for both the NCDH and the NCDPW to follow so that surveillance and control measures can be accomplished. Included in this plan are detailed descriptions on public health concerns, mosquito biology, mosquito surveillance, larval control, adult control, regulatory and permitting requirements, public education and community outreach, and annual control reporting and plan review. The matrix within the plan allows for the NCDH to review the surveillance data, discuss recommendations with the NCDPW and finally reach timely decisions for the NCDPW to perform larvicide and/or adulticide control activities. A table preceding the matrix provides a guideline for the NCDPW staff to follow when responding to complaints. A schedule to daily trap and collect mosquitoes from 42 trap sites provides data that disclose areas experiencing peak viral activity and high populations that should be evaluated and treated. Weekly meetings held between the Departments ensure that effective communication and collaboration on objectives are achieved. The opportunity for the NCDH to comment on spray maps created by the NCDPW allows for the description of the spray areas to be more easily described in the public notifications. Outreach to academia provides training to staff. A research scientist from the NYS Vector Ecology Laboratory provided mosquito training to NCDH staff to improve speciation and reduce the number of unspecified mosquito reported. An Associate Professor from Rutgers University shared her information and findings on several ATM studies that were performed in New Jersey to control the ATM population. Communication with NYC and Suffolk County provides a regional understanding of mosquito activity. Collaboration with the OEM helps to alert the public of when and where spray activities are to occur. Public outreach through presentations, participation in events, and dissemination of ATM brochures encourages residents to evaluate conditions around their homes that may serve as breeding sites for mosquitoes and through the elimination of standing water can reduce exposures to disease and mosquito population. Innovation Evidence based strategies used in devleoping the practice 1. NYS DOH: Decision Matrix: West Nile Virus Surveillance Agency Response Triggering Thresholds: http://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/west_nile_virus/response_plan/2000/appendixa.htm2. Bajwa W, O’Connor M, Slavinski, S, Campbell M, and Shah Z. 2011. Comprehensive Mosquito Surveillance and Control Plan 2011. New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, NY. P.38.3. Suffolk County Vector Control and Wetlands Management Long- Term Plan; Generic Environmental Impact Statement. Suffolk County Department of Public Works, Division of Vector Control.4. Dunlop, T.S, Moore, C., Mesch, K., Kramer, W. Before the Swarm: Guidelines for the Emergency Management of Mosquito-Borne Disease Outbreaks.5. Fonseca, Dina. (2012) Area-Wide Management of the Asian Tiger Mosquito Project – The Fifth Year. [Power Point]. This practice is a creative use of an existing tool or practice. Process used to determine that the practice is a creative use of an existing tool or practiceThe NCDH and the NCDPW often struggle to reach decisions on when or whether mosquito and human data and conditions suggested that adulticide measures were warranted, thereby creating significant delays. This resulted in the County to be reactive to public outcry. The newly emergent ATM created more challenges in that the most effective time to apply adulticide is during daylight. This aggressive daytime biter heightened the public’s concern and distress. Therefore a proactive role that supported an enhanced collaboration between the NCDH and the NCDPW was needed to address the issue of controlling mosquitoes, particularly, the ATM. Proactive roles taken by the Departments allowed for decisions to apply adulticide to be based on science and be conducted in a timely manner, in addition, to collaboratively educate the public on how they can be proactive in reducing mosquito breeding areas around their homes. What tool or practice was used in a creative way to create the practiceNassau County established a Mosquito Control program in 1915, began surveillance activities in 1970, and divided the responsibilities of the program between the NCDH and the NCDPW in 2006. As a result of the concerns and challenges faced with the surveillance and control of the newly emergent ATM it became apparent that enhanced collaboration between the Department’s and modifications to the NCMSCP were needed. Commissioners from both Departments shared a common vision in endorsing inter-agency cooperation and shared resources. Their attendance to critical planning meetings helped to foster communication and provide for timely answers and decisions to comments, recommendations and requests for resources. Liaisons for each Department were assigned to provide direct oversight of the program, review and exchange comments to the NCMSCP, maintain regular communication, attend meetings, assist in the coordination of assignments, and troubleshoot with logistics. Weekly inter and intra-departmental meetings comprised of supervisory and program staff were very productive. Weekly internal meetings encouraged and empowered all staff to discuss and develop new approaches to the program. Weekly inter-departmental meetings resulted in staff gaining a better perspective and understanding of each Department’s tasks. Collaboration with the OEM was fostered to utilize their mass notification system to disseminate the County Executive’s message of planned spray events to the public. Endorsement of the new NCMSCP from elected officials sent a common message to the public. The Nassau County Commissioner of Health dedicated multiple evenings to speak directly to the residents on the new NCMSCP. On a few occasions elected officials were present to aide in the conveyance of the commitment and importance of the program to the residents. How this practice differs from other approaches used to address the public health issueThis practice differs from other approaches in that it addresses the growing concern on how to control the ATM. This species is a daytime-biter and the application of adulticide represents a logistical problem when residents are out and about. Therefore, public education and outreach is critical in the control of this species. The Commissioner’s of Health and of Public Works attended critical planning meetings for their direct input and accommodation of resources. Liaisons for each Department communicated regularly. An ATM brochure was vetted through the County Executive’s office and was disseminated to the public. Staff attended a Safety Fair to educate residents on the ATM and provided examples of mosquito breeding sites and how to eliminate standing water around their homes. The NCDH sought guidance from an Associate Professor from the Center of Vector Biology at Rutgers University who has performed several vector control studies on the ATM. There are 8 existing model practices in NACCHO’s Model Practice Database dedicated to Mosquito Surveillance and Control. This practice differs from the others in that it addresses the growing concern on how to control the Asian Tiger Mosquito.
Local Health Department and Community Collaboration Primary StakeholdersThe primary stakeholders in this practice are: Nassau County Department of Health Nassau County Department of Public Works New York State Department of Health New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Office of Emergency Management Nassau County Residents (1.34 million) Nassau County Elected Officials LHD RoleThe Nassau County Department of Health’s is vested with the authority to safeguard the public health and welfare of its county residents. It is responsible in this practice for surveillance activities and public outreach and notification. Surveillance activities include setting and collecting mosquito traps. There are 42 traps located throughout the county. Each day trapped mosquitoes are brought to the Nassau County laboratory where mosquitoes are separated sorted, speciated, pooled and then mailed to the New York State laboratory located in Wadsworth, NY. Data is then entered onto the New York State Health Information Network where it is evaluated for viral activity and compared with population counts. The NCDH shares this information with the NCDPW to determine what areas should receive larvicide or adulticide application. Press releases and public notifications are prepared. The public notifications includes a map that depicts the boundaries of the area to be sprayed with adulticide. The NCDH establishes a call center to answers inquiries from the public. At the end of each season the NCDH creates an annual Mosquito Control Report. Equally as important, the NCDH participates in public outreach to disseminate information on mosquitoes and how best to combat against the Asian Tiger Mosquito. The NCDH Public Information Officer responds to media inquiries and attends senior citizen events to disseminate ATM brochures. Stakeholders/PartnersThe Nassau County Department of Public Works, under Chapter XII, Article F of the Nassau County Administrative Code, has the authority to conduct mosquito control. They perform surveys of the of the storm water recharge basins, upland, and salt marsh areas to determine the presence of mosquito breeding. Contingent upon the presence of mosquito larvae will determine if aerial or hand larvicide application is conducted. Based on surveillance information spray maps are created defining the boundaries of an area to be applied with an adulticide. These maps are then submitted to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) for review and approval. The NYSDEC evaluates the maps to ensure that all exclusion areas and boundaries are accurately included on the maps. If aerial larvicide or adulticide measures are needed the NCDPW will contract with a private licensed applicator. Truck application of adulticide is perform by licensed NCDPW staff. The OEM assists the NCDH in providing notification to the public through a mass notification system. Elected officials assist in fielding questions posed by their constituents and aide in disseminating information on the ATM. Residents take a proactive role in reducing mosquito breeding areas around their home. The NCDH fosters collaboration with community stakeholders by participating and networking at meetings and events. For this practice, the County Administration assisted the NCDH by arranging space from public libraries and a Village Hall for the Nassau County Department of Health Commissioner to conduct public forums and present a PowerPoint presentation on the NCMSCP. The NCDH collaborates with the OEM in the preparation and responses to emergencies. As a result of a shared partnership, the OEM invited the NCDH to participate in a Nassau County Safety Fair. This event was planned and coordinated by the OEM whereby county and local agencies and private companies participated in providing safety information to the public. This event provided an environment for the NCDH to foster communication and network with other agencies and private organizations. The NCDH attended a symposium held at the Suffolk County Health Department to become informed of the procedures and actions taken by its neighboring counties, NYC and Suffolk County, on how they plan to address the ATM population. Periodic discussions with the entomologists from NYC and Suffolk County were conducted throughout the season to determine how WNV activity and ATM population was occurring regionally. An established rapport with NYC resulted in an invitation for NCDH staff to attend the NYC Annual Integrated Pest Management Training where experts from the NYSDEC, Connecticut Center for Vector Biology and Zoonotic Diseases, and Rutgers University, Vector Biology Unit presented. The NCDH sought the assistance from the New York State Department of Health to improve with mosquito identification. Staff assigned to the Surveillance program attended mosquito identification training from a research scientist at the New York State Vector Ecology Laboratory at Fordham University to become more proficient in speciation. NCDH reached out to a few residents and a country club to set additional mosquito traps in a few areas of Nassau County to acquire additional surveillance. Data from these traps helped to determine the extent of ATM populations and effectiveness of control measures. Lessons LearnedA major contributing factor responsible in successfully developing inter-departmental collaboration was with the formation of Department liaisons. The liaisons were assigned to provide direct oversight of the program, review and exchange comments to the NCMSCP, maintain regular communication, attend meetings, assist in the coordination of assignments, and troubleshoot with logistics. The liaisons proved to be very effective in communicating clear messages so that the tasks for each Department could be successfully met. The Commissioner’s of the NCDH and the NCDPW actively participated in the program and significantly aided in developing collaboration between the Departments. Each Commissioner attended critical meetings and events and they issued clear directives for staff to follow. A major barrier in developing collaborations was the limitation on resources. Given the current reduction of staff and services resulting from layoffs and fiscal limitations the opportunity to participate in events and network with community stakeholders is difficult. Implementation The following specific tasks were taken to achieve each goal and objective of the practice: 1. Revise the NCMSCP.2. Devise a decision matrix for the application of larvicide and adulticide.3. Devise a response plan for complaints.4. Conduct inter-departmental meetings with the NCDH and the NCDPW.5. Acquire the NYSDEC exclusion zones within Nassau County prior to the onset of the Mosquito season.6. Conduct weekly inter-departmental meetings to review surveillance data to defined boundaries for planned spray areas.7. Dedicate NCDPW staff to create GIS shape files for proposed spray events.8. Submit shape files for NYSDEC approval.9. Forward shape files to the NCDH to modify for public notification.10. Prepare a power point on the revised NCMSCP and the ATM.11. Present the revised NCMSCP to elected officials and at public forums. 12. Conduct public forums to educate the public on the revised NCMSCP and the ATM.13. Create a brochure on the ATM.14. Disseminate brochures to the public on the ATM.15. Establish a call center on the day’s adulticide measures are taken to answer questions from the public. 16. Activate a NCDPW mosquito hotline number throughout the mosquito season to answer general mosquito inquiries and record mosquito complaints. The following timeframe was given to carry out each of the aforementioned tasks: 1. February through May 2012 to revise the NCMSCP.2. February through May 2012 to devise a decision matrix for the application of larvicide and adulticide.3. February through May 2012 to devise a response plan for complaints.4. February through October 15, 2012 conduct weekly inter-departmental meetings with the NCDH and the NCDPW.5. April through May 2012 to acquire the NYSDEC exclusion zones within Nassau County prior to the onset of the Mosquito season.6. June 2012 through October 15, 2012 conduct weekly inter-departmental meetings to review surveillance data.7. June through October 15, 2012 dedicate NCDPW staff to create GIS shape files for proposed spray events.8. June through October 15, 2012 submit shape files for NYSDEC approval.9. June through October 15, 2012 forward shape files to the NCDH to modify for public notification.10. June 2012 prepare a power point presentation on the NCMSCP and the ATM.11. July 2012 present the revised NCMSCP to elected officials and at public forums. 12. July 2012 through September 2012 conduct public forums on the revised NCMSCP and the ATM.13. May 2012 create the ATM brochure.14. June through October 2012 disseminate brochures to the public on the ATM.15. July through September 2012 activate a call center to answer calls from the public on the days adulticide measures are conducted. 16. June through October 2012 answer mosquito inquiries and record mosquito complaints. The following basic steps were taken to implement the practice. 1. Assign a liaison to each department to oversee the coordination of tasks.2. Utilize the CDC Intern to the best of their ability to search the internet for information and to assist in crafting the ATM brochure and power point presentation.3. Speak with the staff regularly for comments and recommendations on revisions to the NCMSCP and procedures.4. Communicate with neighboring counties and academic institutions for guidance and exchange of information. 5. Compare the NCMSCP with other mosquito plans from neighboring counties and the NYS Health Department. 6. Provide the NCDH Commissioner with status reports and invite him/her to critical planning meetings.7. Request assistance from the County IT Department to authorize assigned staff to access computer files on a shared directory. This avoids sending large files over the internet and an efficient exchange of information.8. Provide simple and clear language for public notification, ATM brochure, and power point presentation.9. Staff the call center with volunteers to allow full time staff to continue to perform their normal duties and minimize impact to overtime expenses. The following lessons were learned from the implementation process: 1. Weekly inter and intra-departmental meetings were found to be considerably helpful in planning and coordinating efforts, this included responding to complaints, reviewing surveillance data, conduct larvicide and adulticide control measures, and convey information to the public in a timely fashion.2. The revised NCMSCP helped to provide useful guidelines to follow.3. The use of liaisons helped to effectively communicate and address each Department’s role while successfully meeting the objective.4. The NCDH and the NCDPW recognize that the development of spray maps is a large undertaking and is very time consuming. 5. The NCDH learned that educating the public on the importance of eliminating standing water around their properties is a comprehensive undertaking. 6. The CDC Intern was very resourceful and an asset to the program.7. Feedback from the staff was useful information and empowered staff to recommend further improvements. Cost of ImplementationThe implementation of the practice did incur additional expenses to the program. The CDC Intern was a paid federal employee.
In 2012, the NCDH and the NCDPW shared a mutual vision to enhance their collaboration to address the newly emergent ATM and successfully implement mosquito surveillance and control measures to protect the health of the public. The NCDOH and the NCDPW worked together to modify the Nassau County Mosquito Surveillance and Control Plan (NCMSCP), increase their communication both inter and intra-departmentally, and outreach to neighboring counties and educational institutions for guidance and training. Each Department designated a liaison to coordinate and troubleshoot initiatives for an improved program. Three of the major objectives established to accomplish the tasks were: 1) to improve the decision process for the application of larvicide and adulticide; 2) to improve the development of spray maps for vector control and public information; and 3) to educate the public on source reduction. Objective 1: To improve the decision process for the application of larvicide and adulticide. 1. Performance Measure: a. To revise the NCMSCP by June 2012.b. To devise a decision matrix in the NCMSCP as a tool to evaluate surveillance data and determine if larvicide and/or adulticide control measures are warranted. c. To devise a table in the NCMSCP, preceding the decision matrix, to assist the NCDPW on actionable measures to perform when responding to complaints. d. To conduct inter and intra-departmental meetings prior to and during the mosquito season. 2. Data a. Primary Sources: 2009 Nassau County Mosquito Control Plan; Draft 2011Nassau County Mosquito Surveillance and Control report. Secondary Sources: NYS DOH: Decision Matrix: West Nile Virus Surveillance Agency Response Triggering Thresholds: http://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/west_nile_virus/response_plan/2000/appendixa.htm Bajwa W, O’Connor M, Slavinski, S, Campbell M, and Shah Z. 2011. Comprehensive Mosquito Surveillance and Control Plan 2011. New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, NY. P.38. Suffolk County Vector Control and Wetlands Management Long- Term Plan; Generic Environmental Impact Statement. Suffolk County Department of Public Works, Division of Vector Control. Dunlop, T.S, Moore, C., Mesch, K., Kramer, W. Before the Swarm: Guidelines for the Emergency Management of Mosquito-Borne Disease Outbreaks. Program and supervisory staff from the NCDH and the NCDPW reviewed these documents, re-evaluated tasks and compiled comments for consideration. In addition, a CDC Intern assigned to the Surveillance program assisted with this assignment. Liaisons for each Department were assigned to provide oversight and coordination. b. Primary Sources: 2009-2011 Nassau County Mosquito Surveillance Data, Secondary Sources: Bajwa W, O’Connor M, Slavinski, S, Campbell M, and Shah Z. 2011. Comprehensive Mosquito Surveillance and Control Plan 2011. New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, NY. P.38.; Suffolk County Vector Control and Wetlands Management Long- Term Plan; Generic Environmental Impact Statement. Suffolk County Department of Public Works, Division of Vector Control.; Dunlop, T.S, Moore, C., Mesch, K., Kramer, W. Before the Swarm: Guidelines for the Emergency Management of Mosquito-Borne Disease Outbreaks.; NYS DOH: Decision Matrix: West Nile Virus Surveillance Agency Response Triggering Thresholds: http://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/west_nile_virus/response_plan/2000/appendixa.htm Program and supervisory staff from the NCDH and the NCDPW applied the surveillance data from previous seasons to the decision matrix/algorithm/flow chart noted in the secondary sources. In addition, a CDC Intern assigned to the surveillance program assisted with this assignment. Liaisons for each Department conducted meetings to review and address comments. c. Primary Sources: NCDPW complaint log collected by the NCDPW Mosquito Control staff and reviewed by their supervisors. Landing countsd. None 3. Evaluation:By June 2012, the NCMSCP was revised to include procedures and a decision matrix to improve the decision-making process for larvicide and adulticide application. Weekly inter and intra-departmental meetings were held throughout the season to review mosquito trap data collected from 42 trap sites, response to complaints, and results of surveys to determine areas of the county that met the thresholds of the matrix and required either larvicide or adulticide measures to be conducted. Both Department’s successfully reached the decision in a timelier manner for a total of 18 adulticide measures to be implemented. NCDPW applied larvicide, where applicable, in their field responses to 2,064 complaints and routine surveys. 4. Feedback :Following the 2012 mosquito season, a meeting was held between the NCDH, the NCDPW and the OEM to discuss the effectiveness of improving the decision process to implement vector control measures. All agreed that the revised NCMSCP helped to provide useful guidelines to follow. The use of liaisons helped to effectively communicate and address each Department’s role while successfully meeting the objective. The NCDPW indicated that additional procedures are needed to address complaints on how they are factored into the decision process. Objective 2: To improve the development of spray maps for vector control and public notification. 1 Performance Measures:a. To acquire the NYSDEC exclusion zones within Nassau County prior to the onset of the Mosquito season.b. To conduct weekly inter-departmental meetings to review surveillance data to defined boundaries for planned spray areas.c. To dedicate NCDPW staff to create GIS shape files for proposed spray events.d. To submit shape files for NYSDEC approval.e. To forward shape files to the NCDH to modify for public notification. 2 Data:a. Primary Source: NYSDEC database of exclusion zonesb. Nonec. Noned. Primary Source: Nassau County Geographical Information Systeme. Primary Source: NCDH press releases and public notification maps, http://www.nassaucountyny.gov/agencies/Health/newsrelease/2012/index.html 3 Evaluation:The NCDPW contacted the NYSDEC in the spring 2012 to acquire all updated exclusion zones that were required to be included on spray maps whenever spray activities were conducted. Inter-departmental weekly meetings to review surveillance data resulted in defining the boundaries of areas to be sprayed. The NCDPW Commissioner arranged for a staff member to be relieved of from his multiple assignments to exclusively dedicate time in creating shape files for planned spray events. Theses shape files were then sent to the NYSDEC for review and approval. Once approved these shape files were tailored for public notification. This procedure was followed throughout the mosquito season. This objective was fully achieved as planned. As a result, spray maps were created for nearly half of the county, adulticide measures were conducted during 18 evenings and public notifications were successfully created on average 7 days earlier than previous years. 4 Feedback:The NCDH and the NCDPW recognize that the development of spray maps is a large undertaking and is very time consuming. An initiative is underway by the NCDPW to continue to develop spray maps until there is a compilation of maps for the entire county in preparation for subsequent mosquito seasons where truck spray operations are necessary. Objective 3: To educate the public on eliminating standing water around their homes. 1 Performance measure: a. To present the revised NCMSCP to elected officials and at public forums. b. To educate the public on the ATM.c. To establish a call center on the days that adulticide measures are taken to answer questions from the public. d. To activate a NCDPW mosquito hotline number throughout the mosquito season to answer general mosquito inquiries and record mosquito complaints. 2 Data:a. Primary Source: Nassau County Mosquito Surveillance and Control Plan (NCMSCP) PowerPoint presentation. A NCDH staff member and a CDC Intern, assigned to work with the NCDH in the Nassau County Mosquito Surveillance program, prepared this presentation on the revised NCMSCP to educate the public on the ATM and on control measures utilized in response to viral activity and persistent high mosquito populations. It also provided guidance on what actions the public can take to eliminate mosquito breeding areas around their homes. Secondary: Nassau County Mosquito Control Plan, revised 2012. b. Primary Source: Asian Tiger Mosquito brochure, April 2012. A NCDH staff member and the CDC Intern worked together to create an ATM brochure. The brochure was vetted through both Commissioners for their comments and approval and then sent to the Nassau County Executive’s press office for final revision and printing. Approximately 10,000 ATM brochures were printed for distribution to the public. This brochure was created to educate the public on the newly emergent ATM and the challenges faced in the control of this species.c. Primary Source: West Nile Virus – Questions and Answers. This document provides frequently asked questions from the public that is used as a guide for staff.d. Primary Source: NCMSCP; Asian Tiger Mosquito brochure. 3 Evaluation: The NCDH learned that educating the public on the importance of eliminating standing water around their properties is a comprehensive undertaking. It is a key component in the control of the ATM yet the ability to measure its effectiveness is difficult. Residents have high expectations for the Nassau County government to control mosquito population. It is a challenge to encourage them to take a proactive role on their part can have a significant impact. A total 4,733 telephone inquiries were received for the days the call center operated. The NCDPW received 2,064 complaints during the season. Each complaint was field investigated and residents were supplied with a copy of the Asian Tiger brochure. The NCDH and the NCDPW received favorable responses from the Nassau County Executive and elected officials on the NCMSCP presentation. The Nassau County Commissioner of Health successfully presented the new NCMSCP to elected officials at a Legislative hearing and at 7 public forums. With the exception of one activist who attended each forum, most residents expressed their appreciation on educating them. There were approximately 100 public attendees at the Legislative hearings and 50 to 200 attendees at each of the public forums. Three Nassau County staff members, the CDC Intern, and the Nassau County Commissioner of Health participated in a Nassau County Safety Fair. Staff distributed the ATM brochure, mosquito magnets and swatters, and general information on protection against mosquitoes and elimination of standing water around their homes to approximately 500 people. Mosquito surveillance equipment was displayed to educate the public on how mosquitoes are trapped and then evaluated by the NCDH. 4 Feedback: The residents who attended the public forums and safety fair expressed their appreciation for the information provided to them on the Asian Tiger Mosquito, as well as, the overall importance to eliminate standing water around their homes to prevent mosquitoes from breeding. It has become apparent that the best method to control the ATM is through public participation. A plan to enhance community collaboration is under consideration. One idea is to contact the public elementary schools for students to enter into a poster contest. This will empower students to have their families become more proactive in this initiative.
Stakeholder CommitmentThere is strong stakeholder commitment to sustain the practice. Nassau County residents express concern to the NCDH, NCDPW, and their elected officials of the potential risk of contracting mosquito-borne diseases and their inability to enjoy the outdoors affecting their quality of life due to the presence of mosquitoes. Surveillance data in recent years has revealed growing populations of the ATM. Since this species is a day-time biter, the ability to control and perform adulticide applications is difficult to coordinate when residents and their families during the summer months are enjoying outdoor activities. Therefore, public education and outreach is critical in the control of this species. NCDPW is provided with the authority under Chapter XII, Article F of the Nassau County Administrative Code to conduct mosquito control. The NCDH is vested with the authority to safeguard the public health and welfare of its county residents under the New York State Public Health Law and regulations. The NCDH are delegated by the NYSDOH to regulate and enforce Public Health Law. SustainabilityThe NCDH and the NCDPW are committed to continue to conduct mosquito surveillance and control activities to protect the health and safety of the residents of Nassau County. A review of activities will be reviewed from the 2012 Mosquito season and comments and recommendations will be made for improvements. The NCDH will apply again for another CDC Intern to be assigned to the program through their Public Health Associate Program. Additional staff will utilize the Nassau County IT Department to provide training on the Geographical Information System on how to create maps. The NCDPW plans to certify additional staff in their Department to provide greater flexibility in assigning tasks to staff. In addition, the NCDPW plans to hire seasonal staff as college volunteers or interns to assist with their program tasks.
 
Processing...


Driving Walking/Biking Public Transit  Get Directions