Campus Community Initiative of the Combating Underage Drinking Coalition

State: MD Type: Model Practice Year: 2011

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The Campus Community Initiative (CCI) addresses underage and hazardous drinking both on and off college campuses and its negative consequences. In 2002, “A Call to Action: Changing the Culture of Drinking at U.S. Colleges”, a report by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Task Force on College Drinking highlighted the extent of this problem. In 2007, according to The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University Report, “Wasting the Best and the Brightest: Substance Abuse at America’s Colleges and Universities” (2007), drinking among college-aged students remains “an alarming public health crisis on college campuses across the nation”. The Campus Community Initiative specifically focuses on areas in Baltimore County affected by underage drinking by students at neighboring colleges. The Campus Community Initiative’s primary goal is to impact policies and practices associated with underage and high-risk drinking by college students in selected Baltimore County communities.

Three objectives have been identified by the Combating Underage Drinking (CUD) Coalition to achieve this goal:

1) Reduce youth access to alcohol,

2) Increase consistent enforcement of alcohol-related laws and policies, and

3) Educate the “impacted” public (community members, parents, college personnel) regarding underage and high-risk drinking among college youth.

Research, stemming from NIAAA’s Rapid Response to College Drinking Problems Initiative, shows that community initiatives aimed at reducing alcohol-related problems among college-aged youth have been effective. The key factor in this effectiveness is a close collaboration between colleges and their neighboring communities. This includes environmental strategies such as vigorous enforcement of underage drinking laws and reduction in the availability of alcohol to individuals under age 21. Overall, CCI seeks to reduce the availability and accessibility of alcohol to college students and, in so doing, reduce the commission of nuisance crimes (noise, public urination, illegal parking, disorderly conduct) and property crimes (primarily destruction of property) in the neighboring communities, and alcohol-related injuries, assaults and driving offenses.

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Baltimore County Department of Health
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Campus Community Initiative of the Combating Underage Drinking Coalition
The Campus Community Initiative (CCI) addresses underage and hazardous drinking both on and off college campuses and its negative consequences. In 2002, “A Call to Action: Changing the Culture of Drinking at U.S. Colleges”, a report by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Task Force on College Drinking highlighted the extent of this problem. In 2007, according to The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University Report, “Wasting the Best and the Brightest: Substance Abuse at America’s Colleges and Universities” (2007), drinking among college-aged students remains “an alarming public health crisis on college campuses across the nation”. The Campus Community Initiative specifically focuses on areas in Baltimore County affected by underage drinking by students at neighboring colleges. The Campus Community Initiative’s primary goal is to impact policies and practices associated with underage and high-risk drinking by college students in selected Baltimore County communities. Three objectives have been identified by the Combating Underage Drinking (CUD) Coalition to achieve this goal: 1) Reduce youth access to alcohol, 2) Increase consistent enforcement of alcohol-related laws and policies, and 3) Educate the “impacted” public (community members, parents, college personnel) regarding underage and high-risk drinking among college youth. Research, stemming from NIAAA’s Rapid Response to College Drinking Problems Initiative, shows that community initiatives aimed at reducing alcohol-related problems among college-aged youth have been effective. The key factor in this effectiveness is a close collaboration between colleges and their neighboring communities. This includes environmental strategies such as vigorous enforcement of underage drinking laws and reduction in the availability of alcohol to individuals under age 21. Overall, CCI seeks to reduce the availability and accessibility of alcohol to college students and, in so doing, reduce the commission of nuisance crimes (noise, public urination, illegal parking, disorderly conduct) and property crimes (primarily destruction of property) in the neighboring communities, and alcohol-related injuries, assaults and driving offenses.
The Campus Community Initiative broadly addresses community health and specifically the safety and health of young adults (ages 18-25). According NIAAA as reported in their October 2002 Alcohol Alert #58, the extent of underage and high-risk drinking on college campuses “is more pervasive and destructive” than the public realizes. More recently, an article in the July supplement of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs reported that alcohol-related deaths among U.S. college students had risen approximately 20% from 1998 – 2005 (from 1440 – 1825) along with an almost 6.5% increase of self-reported binge drinking (5 or more alcoholic drinks on any occasion in the past 30 days.)
Agency Community RolesIn the late 1990’s, the Baltimore County Department of Health, Bureau of Substance Abuse (now the Bureau of Behavioral Health) established the Combating Underage Drinking (CUD) Coalition that consisted of representatives from several government and private agencies to address the problem of underage drinking in the County. As information and materials on evidence-based programs and best practices in prevention were disseminated nationally, Bureau staff offered technical assistance and prepared member agencies and organizations to move toward a research-based prevention approach. Fiscal year 2005 offered a funding opportunity to develop, implement and evaluate an evidence-based prevention strategy. As a result of the foundation laid by Bureau staff regarding EBPs and best practices, the coalition adopted Communities Mobilizing for Change on Alcohol (CMCA) adapting its environmental strategy to mobilize selected County communities impacted by the drinking behavior of students attending local colleges. Costs and ExpendituresThe Campus Community Initiative (CCI) addresses underage and hazardous drinking both on and off college campuses and its negative consequences. In 2002, “A Call to Action: Changing the Culture of Drinking at U.S. Colleges”, a report by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Task Force on College Drinking highlighted the extent of this problem. In 2007, according to The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University Report, “Wasting the Best and the Brightest: Substance Abuse at America’s Colleges and Universities” (2007), drinking among college-aged students remains “an alarming public health crisis on college campuses across the nation”.The Campus Community Initiative specifically focuses on areas in Baltimore County affected by underage drinking by students at neighboring colleges. The Campus Community Initiative’s primary goal is to impact policies and practices associated with underage and high-risk drinking by college students in selected Baltimore County communities. Three objectives have been identified by the Combating Underage Drinking (CUD) Coalition to achieve this goal: 1) Reduce youth access to alcohol, 2) Increase consistent enforcement of alcohol-related laws and policies, and 3) Educate the “impacted” public (community members, parents, college personnel) regarding underage and high-risk drinking among college youth. Research, stemming from NIAAA’s Rapid Response to College Drinking Problems Initiative, shows that community initiatives aimed at reducing alcohol-related problems among college-aged youth have been effective. The key factor in this effectiveness is a close collaboration between colleges and their neighboring communities. This includes environmental strategies such as vigorous enforcement of underage drinking laws and reduction in the availability of alcohol to individuals under age 21. Overall, CCI seeks to reduce the availability and accessibility of alcohol to college students and, in so doing, reduce the commission of nuisance crimes (noise, public urination, illegal parking, disorderly conduct) and property crimes (primarily destruction of property) in the neighboring communities, and alcohol-related injuries, assaults and driving offenses. In the late 1990’s, the Baltimore County Department of Health, Bureau of Substance Abuse (now the Bureau of Behavioral Health) established the CUD Coalition which consisted of representatives from several government and private agencies to address the problem of underage drinking in the County. The Coalition sought to develop a proven environmental strategy specifically to address the problems of alcohol misuse by the County’s college students. In July 2004 (FY 2005), through funding by the Maryland Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration, the Coalition began implementation of the Campus Community Initiative utilizing Communities Mobilizing for Change on Alcohol (CMCA), a community-organizing program on SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices. The plan was to implement CMCA in target communities surrounding the County’s major four-year colleges: Towson University, Goucher College, University of Maryland-Baltimore County and Villa Julie College (now Stevenson University). Now in its seventh year of implementation, the Campus Community Initiative has experienced success in meeting its three objectives. Each year a review of CCI’s activities and its results is conducted. As system change requires ongoing effort both in creating shifts in public attitudes and practices and in reinforcing those positive shifts, performance measures are adjusted accordingly year to year. Two factors have led to the success of CCI. The first is the use of a recognized evidence-based strategy and commitment to the use of identified best practices. This has guided the Coalition to develop a shared focus and approach that employs specific interventions with clear guidelines for effectiveness.  ImplementationA. Reduce Youth Access to Alcohol • Baltimore County Police given ID scanning equipment for enforcement details. (2 years). • Loan scanners and provide alcohol licensee training. (Ongoing, began in 2006). • Compliance checks utilize underage cadets and undercover police officers. (Ongoing, began in 1990s). • Support Liquor Board’s enforcement by attending hearings regarding problematic licensees and new license requests that could be detrimental to the community. (Ongoing since 2005) • Responsible retailers who sign the Cooperating Tavern and Alcohol Retailers’ Agreement receive window clings informing the community of their commitment to responsible practices. (Launched in 2007) • The Liquor Board (L.B.) promotes ID scanner use by new alcohol licensees and mandates their use for repeat non-compliance. (Ongoing since 2007) • Work with Liquor Board and Baltimore County Licensed Beverage Association to develop tools to educate alcohol licensees about responsible service. (Began in 2010) • Educate the public about how to report alcohol establishments that serve underage youth to the Liquor Board. (Ongoing since 2005) • Party Bus Patrols - a collaboration of County Police, DUI Task Force and MD State Police targeting students traveling to City bars where they have easy access to alcohol. Underage youth are cited and buses that fail inspections are fined/removed from service. (Ongoing since 2008) •Student Ambassadors from local colleges visit students living off campus and encourage them to be responsible neighbors. (Ongoing, began 2009)     B. Increase consistency of enforcement of alcohol-related laws and policies as they apply to underage and high-risk drinking. • Additional funding (overtime) provided by local University allows police to hold supplementary enforcement. ( Ongoing, began in 2009) • Inform the community how to report sales to minors. (Ongoing, began 2005) • Increase the number of Towson University students receiving citations for alcohol related offenses. (Ongoing, began in 2004). • Monitor results of the Liquor Board’s Show-Cause Hearings (Ongoing, results have shown an increase in penalties since 2005 when the L.B. Chairman became involved with the Coalition). • The State’s Attorney educates the Judiciary about high-risk drinking’s negative impact. (Ongoing) • Establishment of an Enforcement Task Force: DUI Task Force, Baltimore County and Towson University Police, and MD State Police. (Ongoing, established in 2009). • DUI Saturation Patrols on college nights and weekends. (Ongoing, began in 2008) • Collaboration between the Liquor Board and State’s Attorney assures student attendance at L.B. Hearings to testify against non-compliant licensees. (Began in 2008 and continues today). .   C. Educate public regarding underage and high-risk drinking among college youth • Candlelight Vigil of Hope and Remembrance increases awareness of impaired driving. College students participate in the Vigil. (Held annually since the 1990s) • Organize a Regional College Symposium for individuals from various colleges to network and share information.(Held bi-annually since 2005) • Participate in college-based Health Fairs in Baltimore County. (Ongoing) • Provide literature for resident advisers, student orientations, peer educators, community workers, faith community, health educators etc. (Ongoing ) • National Alcohol Screening Day held annually at local University. 
The objectives of the Coalition’s Campus Community Initiative have remained constant since its inception with performance measures tailored to current identified issues. Objective 1: Reduce youth access to alcohol 2010 Performance Measures: (Address commercial availability) A. Annually increase the installation and use of ID scanners by 20% from FY 09 (OJJDP Best Practice 6) B. Sustain the use of ID scanners by developing a local policy (OJJDP Best Practice 6) (Address non-commercial availability) C. Develop local strategies to restrict minors’ access to bars and nightclubs through use of “Party Buses” (OJJDP Best Practice 5) D. Develop and sustain peer-led interventions (CSAP P-6 and S-3) Data Collection: A record of events is compiled and maintained by the Coalition facilitator; Collected jurisdictional data is provided by the State’s Attorney’s Office, College/University Police, College/University staff and students, Baltimore County Police –Traffic Safety Division and specific Precincts, the Baltimore County Liquor Board and the Maryland State Highway Administration Logistics: Data is collected monthly and reported on a fiscal year basis (July – June) Feedback: The Coalition facilitator and prevention program evaluator receive the data results. The data is presented at the CUD coalition meetings. The coalition members interpret the data via their organizational experiences. The outcomes desired are identified by the coalition. Coalition members developed strategies via their organization’s capabilities. Opportunities for collaboration are identified, encouraged and supported by the coalition. By coalition consensus performance measures are stated with recommendations for the most feasible period of time for implementation. At each CUD meeting, coalition members provide a status report on the results, challenges and barriers in reaching each performance measure. Performance measures met are recognized and celebrated by the coalition. Unmet performance measures are re-evaluated to determine barriers, current value, feasibility and appropriateness as related to the most current data available and other related changes/achievements. All information is provided to our LHD officials. Evaluation Results for FY 10: 1.A. Thirty alcohol licensees have purchased ID scanners – an increase of 70% since FY 09 1.B. Following a strong recommendation from the coalition the Liquor Board instituted a new policy which mandates the use of scanners by all non compliant alcohol licensees and strongly recommends that all new alcohol licensees use ID scanners. 1.C. Coalition members developed and employed the following strategies to address Party Bus events: Party buses promotional flyers are not permitted on college campuses; Party buses are not allowed to stop anywhere on college campuses; enforcement officers are stationed near Party Bus off campus pick up sites to observe and site students with open containers; Party buses are stopped and checked for safety, code compliance, minors and alcohol violations; Party Bus violations result in fines and removal from service; Enforcement Officers meet with Party Bus promoters to remind them of the alcohol laws and consequences and to encourage their voluntary compliance. Results included one bus company decision to discontinue Party Bus trips in our county; and less than 2% of the Party Bus occupants are minors as compared to 25% in previous years 1.D.Towson University sustained the Student Community Ambassadors program – students who live in the community serve as positive liaisons between students, their community neighbors and the University that was started in FY 09. The FY 10 data indicates that at least 80% of the program members continued to be actively involved. 
The Combating Underage Drinking Coalition (CUD) has been in existence since the late 1990s and continues to meet bi-monthly at the Baltimore County Department of Health. One of the most significant process outcomes of the Coalition’s efforts and degree of success is the high level of stakeholder commitment. Membership continues to expand. The number of actively involved agencies and organizations on the CUD Coalition is growing. A list of member agencies is attached. Several agencies have more than one member attending the Coalition meetings. A focus group of key Coalition members organized by the program evaluator at that time, confirmed the effectiveness of the CUD Coalition’s Campus Community Initiative. The key informants indicated that: o The Coalition gives legitimacy to the problem of underage drinking o Its activities are “impressive” o There is growing interagency cooperation and collaboration that would never have occurred naturally o Members experience the satisfaction of witnessing progress on issues o There are many benefits that result from networking and sharing insights and resources with fellow members. o This embedded motivation sustains the ongoing mission of the Coalition and CCI’s work. Although continuance of funding is not always predictable, the commitment that exists among Coalition members is an intangible force that is capable of sustaining the Coalition’s mission despite any adverse condition that may arise. The good will and collaboration that’s developed over the years continues to flourish. Partnerships have grown and led to new and innovative environmental strategies. Recruitment continues and recent additions to CUD’s membership have contributed to the vision that Coalition members share. As a result of the work of the CUD Coalition, another Maryland jurisdiction has requested assistance in establishing a Campus Community Initiative in their area. CUD members have also been invited to participate in other community coalitions to assist them in identifying effective strategies. Collaboration across jurisdictions is another good predictor of the longevity of the CUD Coalition. Combating Underage Drinking Coalition Members The following Combating Underage Drinking Coalition members are actively involved in the Coalition and attend meetings regularly. Several member agencies have more than one person who attending Coalition Meetings. 1. Baltimore County State’s Attorney 2. Baltimore County Liquor Board 3. Baltimore County Police - Including representatives from the following: • DUI Task Force • Towson Precinct • Crash Team • Juvenile Offenders in Need of Supervision 4. Maryland State Police 5. Baltimore 5. County Department of Corrections 6. Colleges and Universities: • Towson University • University of Maryland Baltimore County and College Park Campuses • Loyola University • Stevenson University • Johns Hopkins University • Goucher College 7. Baltimore County Safe & Drug Free Schools 8. Faith Community - Ascension Lutheran 9. Health Educators Linking Parents and Students Coalition (HELPS) 10. Hereford Zone Cares Coalition (HZ Cares) 11. Jewish Community Services (JCS) 1 12. SAFE Program – Sexual Assault and Rape Prevention Program at Greater Baltimore Medical Center 13. Positive Alternatives to Dangerous and Destructive Decisions (PADDD) 14. 14. Greater Towson Council of Community Associations
 
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